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Excerpt from Inaugural Addresses by Lords Rectors of the University of Glasgow: To Which Are Prefixed, an Historical Sketch and Account of the Present State of the UniversityThe office of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow, has at all timesMoreExcerpt from Inaugural Addresses by Lords Rectors of the University of Glasgow: To Which Are Prefixed, an Historical Sketch and Account of the Present State of the UniversityThe office of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow, has at all times been filled by men of eminent learning, illustrious rank, or high public station. But Francis Jeffrey, on his Installation in 1820, imparted new interest and dignity to that Academic distinction. Instead of accepting the Rectorship in the formal and almost silent manner of his predecessors, that celebrated Critic regaled with an eloquent Address the audience that thronged to witness his return to the early Nurse of his studies. The example which he set has been followed by the distinguished individuals who have succeeded him, and the Lords Rectors Addresses now form a valuable addition to the stores of our national eloquence.As these Addresses had appeared only in the public Journals, or in ephemeral publications, I thought that I would perform no unacceptable service to my fellow-alumni, and the lovers of literature in general, by collecting authentic copies of them, while it was still possible, and presenting the whole to the public in a worthy form.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.